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Glasgow

Coordinates: 55°51′29″N 4°15′32″W / 55.858, -4.259

Glasgow (pronounced /ˈglæzgoʊ/) is the largest city in Scotland and third most populous in the United Kingdom. Fully named as the City of Glasgow, it is the most populous of Scotland's 32 unitary authority areas. The city is situated on the River Clyde in the country's west central lowlands. A person from Glasgow is known as a Glaswegian, which is also the name of the local dialect.

Glasgow grew from the medieval Bishopric of Glasgow and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow, which contributed to the Scottish Enlightenment. From the 18th century the city became one of Europe's main hubs of transatlantic trade with the Americas. With the Industrial Revolution, the city and surrounding region grew to become one of the world's pre-eminent centres of engineering and shipbuilding,[4] constructing many revolutionary and famous vessels. Glasgow was known as the "Second City of the British Empire" for much of the Victorian era.[5][6][7] Today it is one of Europe's top twenty financial centres and is home to many of Scotland's leading businesses.[8]

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries Glasgow grew to a population of over one million,[9] and was the fourth-largest city in Europe, after London, Paris and Berlin.[10] In the 1960s, large-scale relocation to new towns and peripheral suburbs, followed by successive boundary changes, have reduced the current population of the City of Glasgow unitary authority area to 580,690.[2] 1,750,500[2] people live in the Greater Glasgow Urban Area based on the 2007 population Estimate.[2] The entire region surrounding the conurbation covers approximately 2.3 million people, 41% of Scotland's population.[11]


The article above is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Glasgow".