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Indianapolis

Indianapolis (pronounced /ˌɪndiəˈnæpəlɪs/) is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana, and the county seat of Marion County, Indiana. The United States Census estimates the city's population (excluding included towns) at 795,458. It is by far Indiana's largest city and is the 13th largest city in the U.S.,the third largest city in the Midwest, and the second most populous state capital (behind Phoenix, Arizona).

For much of its history, Indianapolis oriented itself around government and industry, particularly manufacturing. Today, Indianapolis has a much more diversified economy, contributing to the fields of education, healthcare, and finance. Tourism is also a vital part of the economy of Indianapolis, and the city plays host to numerous conventions and sporting events. Of these, perhaps most well known is the annual Indianapolis 500 race. Other major sporting events include the Allstate 400 and the Men's and Women's NCAA Basketball Tournaments.

Greater Indianapolis has seen moderate growth among U.S. cities[3], especially in nearby Hamilton, Hendricks, and Johnson counties. [4] The population of the combined statistical area is estimated at 2,014,267, making it the 23rd-largest CSA in the U.S.

Indianapolis was selected as the site of the new state capital in 1820. Jeremiah Sullivan, a judge of the Indiana Supreme Court, invented the name Indianapolis by joining Indiana with polis, the Greek word for city; literally, Indianapolis means "Indiana City". The city was founded on the White River under the incorrect assumption that the river would serve as a major transportation artery; however, the waterway was too sandy for trade. The capital moved from Corydon on January 10, 1825 and the state commissioned Alexander Ralston to design the new capital city. Ralston was an apprentice to the French architect Pierre L'Enfant, and he helped L'Enfant plan Washington, DC. Ralston's original plan for Indianapolis called for a city of only one square mile (3 km²). At the center of the city sat Governor's Circle, a large circular commons, which was to be the site of the governor's mansion. Meridian and Market Streets converge at the Circle and continue north and south and east and west, respectively. The governor's mansion was eventually demolished in 1857 and in its place stands a 284-foot (87 m) tall neoclassical limestone and bronze monument, the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument. The surrounding street is now known as Monument Circle.


The article above is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Indianapolis".